Atwood Hall

"There are here displayed a few views of the new St. Lawrence University Theological School which your generous and loyal interest has built. Atwood Memorial Hall is a fitting tribute to the memory of a great Universalist family. It even exceeds expectations in beauty and functioning capacity. The dedication and formal opening of Atwood Memorial will be on the evening of October 17th. The faculty and trustees hope that you will be able to join them on that occasion. They would like you to see the building and furnishings that you have provided, and to help in dedicating it to the great service for which it is intended."
- Angus H. MacLean, Dean (In a letter to Alumni and Friends of the St. Lawrence Theological School)

Erected in 1955, Atwood Hall served as the second Theological School building for the Theological School at St. Lawrence University. Richardson Hall, the first college building, which originally contained Theological School classrooms, office and dormitory, was erected in 1858. The Theological school then moved its classrooms and students to Fisher Hall. This was the first Theological School building. It was erected in 1883 and was destroyed by fire in 1951. Atwood Hall would become the final home of the Theological School at St. Lawrence University when it eventually closed in June 1965. Atwood Hall now houses the Education Department which offers classes for both the undergraduate and graduate Education Programs.
Excerpts taken from, "109 Years: An Account of the Theological School of St. Lawrence University."

Edson R. Miles Memorial Reredos

The symbols incorporated in the design, starting at the bottom of the panel are:

    • The Chinese symbol depicting "double joy," denotes conjugal bliss.
    • The Sanskrit OM which symbolizes Hinduism's divine principle.
    • The seven-branched menorah of Judaism.
    • The Chinese sign for water, a life-giving source.
    • The Lotus flower associated with the Buddhist doctrine expressing the flowering of the human spirit.
    • The anchor of Christian hope.
    • The Menorah is the upright of the Christian cross.
    • The small golden circle enclosing two circular solids.
    • The circular Yang and Yin of the Confucian and Taoist philosophies, suggesting the inter-acting energy modes in all aspects of nature.
    • Around this symbol are rays emanating from it standing for the Shinto faith of Japan.
    • A Celtic cross may be seen around the Yang and Yin with its upright beginning in the lotus flower on the right of the panel and going at an angle towards the upper left of the reredos.