100,000 Meter Challenge

By: 
Sarah Evarts
Class of: 
2017

During my first weeks here at St. Lawrence, there were so many posters I didn’t know which to read first.  The one that stood out to me the most was the poster that said, “Do you want to do something extraordinary?” My answer to this question was “Of course!” This led me to attend a meeting for the St. Lawrence women’s crew team, a sport that I had no experience in prior to SLU. This meeting sucked me in and I joined the team. The poster was exactly right - there is just one word that describes SLU Crew: extraordinary.

Months after joining the team, on Friday, February 14th (yes, Valentine’s Day!), both the men and women’s teams spent the day (and part of the night) in the Multipurpose Room of Newell Fitness Center with a goal in sight: to erg (stationary row) 100,000 meters as fast as possible. That's 62.14 miles or 528,000 feet. This annual event raises money for the team’s training trip in Tampa, Florida over Spring Break. Combined, there are roughly fifty members of both teams and we set out to row this feat together.

We started rowing around 3 p.m., each taking turns on a single ergometer for roughly 300-meter pieces at a time. This marathon of erging continued for hours with each person rowing between eight and 10 times, and just under seven hours later, we accomplished our goal.

This was one of the best team bonding activities I could imagine, with everyone cheering for one another and working toward a common goal (not to mention the fact that we were all stuck in the same room for all these hours). I realized that this goal, while seemingly impossible, was something we all were so proud to achieve this together.

The biggest thing I have realized while being on this team is that we accomplish extraordinary things every day. This experience brought me closer to my teammates and made me fall even further in love with SLU Crew. I can’t wait for our training trip over Spring Break because I know we will continue to accomplish extraordinary goals together.