Summer Programs

St. Lawrence offers an array of dynamic summer courses around the world. Click on the links below for course descriptions and tentative dates and cost information. Please note that all courses are contingent on sufficient enrollment and course fees amounts are subject to change.

Online applications for these programs will be available November 10, and applications will be due February 1. A first payment of $400 will be due February 27, and full payment due by April 1.

If you have any questions about any of these programs, please contact the program instructor(s). 

Alaska: Down to Earth

Denmark: Neuroscience of Fear

England: Church and State in the United States and Great Britain

Ethiopia: Out of Jurassic of Simplicity of Knowledge: Africa, Outpost to Complexity

Ghana: Global Ghana: African Democracy and Postcolonial Culture

Ireland: Place and Nationalism in Ireland

Kenya: Healthcare Delivery in a Developing Country

Mexico: Cultural Ecology in Yucatan: the role of the ejido system in the Mayas

Rwanda: Engaging Rwanda: Conservation, Development, and Reconciliation

Southern US: The Civil Rights Trail: The Civil Rights Movement in Memory

 

Alaska: Down to Earth

Instructor: Eileen Visser and Alexander Stewart

Dates: May 21 - June 1

Cost: $4,900* + airfare

Listing: BIOL/GEOL 248 w/ Lab

Units: 1 SLU Unit/3.6 Credits 

Course Description: This course will take a three-fold approach linking physical and biological factors the the role of humans in this unique environment.  Students will practice collection of observational date on the geology and ecology of south central Alaska, and use these data to form the basis for discussions on fragility/resilience, the relationship between the value of nature as wilderness and/or resources in this last frontier, and the historical and current interactions of humans with the natural world.  They will apply the scientific method to answer questions about the interaction of socio-economic and political issues with geological and ecological factors. Emphasis will be placed upon formation of physical features and current dynamics of earthquakes, glaciers, and global climate change as well as the terrestrial and nearshore marine ecosystems and the contact they provide for human ecology, adaptive strategies sand resource utilization with the ecosystem.  Format will be field-based lessons, giving students the opportunity to be part of the physical and biological environment they study. Primary course object is to investigate the full scope of Alaskan ecology, the relationship between all living organisms, including humans, and the physical context with which they exist.  Prerequisites: GEOL 103 or BIOL 101 or ENVS 101 or permission of the instructors.

Pre-requisite: GEOL 103, BIOL 101, ENVS 101 or permission of instructor

*Subject to change

Apply Now

Back to top.

 

Denmark: Neuroscience of Fear

Instructor: David Hornung and Daniel Kurtz

Dates: May 25 - June 12

Costs: $4,900* + airfare

Listing: NRSCI 247

Units: 1 SLU Unit/3.6 Credits

Course Description: Humans share similar brain structures, controlling the fear response, with mammals, birds and reptiles. These structures are evolutionally preserved because fear helps protect us from danger, injury and death. Now, we live removed from the dangerous elements of nature, but our primal fear instincts remain. Do emotions have a function in our consciousness today or are they merely intrusions from another time? We will examine the evolutionary aspects of the fear response, how it ties into decision-making and our everyday lives. We will examine this issue from a multidisciplinary perspective, synthesizing recent work from the fields of biology, psychology, neuroscience and philosophy. Labs will include a gross anatomy lab, sensory lab and tour of the department of Neurology.

Pre-requisite: Either a year of college biology or two psychology courses.

*Subject to change

Apply Now

Back to top.

 

England: Church and State in the United States and Great Britain

Instructor: Michael Greenwald and Claudia Setzer

Dates: May 31 - June 21

Cost: $4,900* + airfare

Listing: RELG 3006; Satisfies Humanities distribution credit.

Units: 1 SLU Unit/3.6 Credits 

Course Description: Study this summer in London as we examine the relationship between church and state in Great Britain and the United States.  Both countries grant freedom of religion to all, and we will examine the different histories and different concepts of “freedom of religion” as they evolved in each country.  We will examine the history of Christianity in England, the conflict between the monarch and the Church that resulted in the monarch being the head of the Church, the establishment of the Church of England as the official religion of England, and the resulting conflicts between Anglicans and Roman Catholics and between Anglicans and “Dissenters.” We will visit Westminster Abbey, Canterbury Cathedral, Benjamin Franklin’s London home, London Central Mosque, West London Synagogue, various non-Anglican churches as well as other pertinent sites.  

*Subject to change

Apply Now

Back to top.

 

Ethiopia: Out of Jurassic of Simplicity of Knowledge: Africa, Outpost to Complexity

Instructor: Abye Assefa and Florence Molk

Dates: May 21 - June 10

Cost: $4,900* + airfare

Listing: SOC/AFS/ANTH/GS 30008

Units: 1 SLU Unit/3.6 Credits 

Course Description: Through observation, interaction, and contemplation this course will allow students to see why and how the logic of simplicity of knowledge, both popular and academic, is obsessed in inventing and reinventing Africa as a violent and chaotic continent. In the process, the course will enable students to value the wisdom and to put into effect the virtues of complexity of knowledge, which can only be obtained on their own terms. For this reason, the spirit of the course is open, honest, and non-judgmental giving students control and confidence in discovering: (a) the lethal nature of simplicity of knowledge and (b) Africa as the secure path to complexity. Accordingly, travelling to Ethiopia is by no means to simply discover strange places and exotic cultures; it is actually to get hold of an opportune setting that is not burdened by the suffocating muzzle of politically correct conformism, and that allows students to reassess and repudiate the Jurassic turmoil in the dominant structure of knowledge.  

*Subject to change

Apply Now

Back to top.

 

Ghana: Global Ghana: African Democracy and Postcolonial Culture

Instructor: Madeleine Wong and Erik Johnson

Dates: May 31 - June 22

Costs: $4,900* + airfare

Listing: GS 3008/AFS 3008/PCA 3002

Units: 1.0 SLU Units/3.6 Credits

Course Description: Nestled into Africa’s Atlantic coast, Ghana was the first sub-Saharan African country to gain independence from colonial rule and is today a vibrant democracy and the center of many rich cultural and musical traditions—from highlife to hiphop. This summer course employs an interdisciplinary approach to focus on three integrated themes: legacies of colonialism and the slave trade; possibilities of African nationalism and pan-Africanism; and culture and politics of public life in contemporary Ghana. Led by Madeleine Wong (Global Studies), Erik Johnson (PCA), and leading local experts, we will tour the "slave castles" of Cape Coast and Elmina (UNESCO World Heritage Sites), stroll across a bridge walkway with a bird’s eye view of the African rainforest in Kakum National Park, and explore Ghana’s capital city Accra (including the W.E.B. Du Bois Memorial Centre, Kwame Nkrumah Memorial Park and Mausoleum, and the sights and sounds of its bustling African markets). Travel to Ghana this summer and earn SLU credit at the crossroads of African politics, diasporic cultural connections, and emerging global economics.

*Subject to change

Apply Now

Back to top.

 

Ireland: Place and Nationalism in Ireland

Instructor: Eve Stoddard and Barry Carson

Dates: July 5 - July 22

Costs: $7,150* + airfare

Listing: ENG/HIST 303 or GS/HIST/PS 285

Units: 2.0 SLU Units/7.2 Credits

Course Description: The program is worth 2 units and comprised of two separate courses. Students can receive credit in English and history for both courses and global studies or peace studies for one of them. We spend the first part of the program in Dublin and then a week in Northern Ireland experiencing the legacies of the conflict there and the evolution of the Peace Process begun in 1998. The last part of the program is spent in Galway. Because the course on landscape and memory emphasizes the importance of place and memorials, we combine some recreational day trips (the Giant’s Causeway and hikes in County Sligo and Connemara) with exploration of folk knowledge about features of the landscape, such as the places sacred to the fairies.

The Irish people’s relationship to the landscape is mediated through the lenses of indigeneity, colonialism, and post-colonialism. From the Mesolithic Newgrange, a UNESCO World Heritage site, to Kilmainham Jail in Dublin, to the murals and remembrance gardens of Belfast and Derry, Ireland’s abundant sacred and historical sites have become signifiers of a conflicted set of historical perspectives.

Throughout the program we visit monuments and memorials and listen critically to the narratives through which they are interpreted. 

*Subject to change

Apply Now

Back to top.

 

Kenya: Healthcare Delivery in a Developing Country

Instructor: Dr. Wairimu Ndirangu

Dates: June 6-27

Costs: $5,400* + airfare

Listing: AFS 248/ANTH 248/SOC

Units: 1.5 SLU Units/5.4 Credits

Course Description: This community-based learning course explores critical issues about health care in a resource-constrained environment both in Kenya and Uganda. The following are a few of the questions that the course strives to answer: What formal and in­formal institutions are most effective in providing preventive and primary health care?   How can communities develop participatory approaches to the management of HIV and other emerging diseases?   Why do highly preventable diseases still continue to burden Africans?   What are the belief systems and health-seeking behaviors in different populations, both rural and urban?   How do traditional healing practices complement western medical approaches to eradicate disease? How does health care delivery in East Africa compare to other developed nations? What is the role of global warming in the emergence, spread and virulence of tropical diseases such as malaria, cholera and other water borne diseases? Highly acclaimed health care professionals and researchers will address these and other issues. Students will be placed in clinics, teaching hospitals, and community and rural health programs, contributing to the work of the organization while assessing its role in the broader provi­sion of health care. The course will be of interest to students concerned about health, social welfare and eco­nomic justice.  It will not only expand the student's current interest in the subjective areas of concern but provoke further questioning in why health care delivery is such an important subject of study. The course integrates fun activities that help students appreciate the landscapes of the continent.

*Subject to change

Apply Now

Back to top.

Mexico: Cultural Ecology in Yucatan: the role of the ejido​ system in the Mayas

Instructor: Martha Chew Sánchez

Dates: August 1 to August 14

Costs: $4,900* + airfare

Listing: GS/CLAS/NAS/SPAN 247

Units: 1.0 SLU Units/3.6 Credits

Course Description: The Yucatan peninsula of Mexico is best known as the land of the ancient Maya who, have inhabited a quite fragile ecological region for over 3000 years. This course will explore the cultural ecology of the present-day Yucatec Maya, their adaptation to a unique tropical forest environment, and their links to a still little-understood past involving environmental change. Some of the questions that are going to be examined in this course are:  How have past dynamics of settlement and natural resource use by the Maya influenced the present environment of Yucatan?  What is the role of the ejido, community land, in their social, political, religious and  life and also in protecting the biodiversity of the area? What role does biodiversity play in the stability and productivity of traditional Mayan agriculture and household subsistence? How is the sustainability of present-day Maya farming affected by regional development like tourism and other patterns of cultural and economic change?

*Subject to change

Apply Now

Back to top.

 

Rwanda: Engaging Rwanda: Conservation, Development and Reconciliation

Instructor: Erika Barthelmess and Amy Vedder

Dates: May 23 - June 13

Costs: $5,400* + airfare

Listing: AFS/ANTH/BIO 3004

Units: 1.5 SLU Units/5.4 Credits

Course Description: To most Americans, Rwanda is associated with a singular event – the horrific 1994 genocide.  Since then, however, Rwanda has undergone a dramatic transformation. On this course, we will engage this exciting country from an interdisciplinary perspective as we work to understand the issues involved in rebuilding Rwanda, a process that includes conservation programs which aim to protect biodiversity while providing economic benefits.  We will visit genocide memorials, ethnographic museums, craft cooperatives, ecotourism projects, national parks, and observe wildlife (including gorillas and other primates); we will hear from Rwandan experts and learn with Rwandan students.  This course is being offered by Dr. Erika Barthelmess and Dr. Amy Vedder.  Dr. Barthelmess is a vertebrate ecologist in the SLU Biology Department and Dr. Vedder is a tropical ecologist; both are conservationists who take scientific approaches to research and recognize the role of geopolitics, social and cultural history, and economics in solving environmental problems. Both have formal training as scientists as well as backgrounds in cross disciplinary problem solving with particular reference to Africa.  For more information about this course, please contact Dr. Barthelmess at barthelmess@stlawu.edu.

*Subject to change

Apply Now

Back to top.

Southern US: The Civil Rights Trail: The Civil Rights Movement and Memory

Instructor: Alan Draper

Dates: May 26 - June 3

Costs: $4,900* + airfare

Listing: GOVT 201

Units: 1.0 SLU Units/3.6 Credits

Course Description: This course introduces students to the history of the civil right movement by visiting memorials and museums dedicated to preserving the Movement's meaning and memory.  Over the course of a week, we will visit civil rights memorials and museums in Atlanta, Montgomery, Birmingham, Memphis, Nashville, and Charlotte.  The goal of the course is to show students how the Movement has been memorialized and its message preserved for future generations.

*Subject to change

Apply Now

Back to top.