Events, Fall 2013

    Harold Weston and the Adirondack Wilderness:
    the Solitude of Nature

    • Lecture by curator Caroline Welsh, Monday, September 16, at 7:00 p.m., in Griffiths 123

    Caroline M. Welsh is an art historian and Director Emerita of the Adirondack Museum in Blue Mountain Lake, N.Y.

    She has lectured and published widely on the subject of Adirondack art and artists. Her most recent publications include Adirondack Prints and Printmakers: The Call of the Wild (1998), winner of the 1999 Ewell L. Newman Award; The View from Asgaard: Rockwell Kent's Adirondack Legacy (with Scott R. Ferris, 2000); In Search of a National Landscape: William Trost Richards and the Artists’ Adirondacks, 1850 – 1870 (with Linda S. Ferber, 2002); and Wild Exuberance: Harold Weston’s Adirondack Art (with Rebecca Foster, 2005).

    • Adirondack Pack Basket Workshop with Clear Creek Weavers, Saturday, October 26, 9:30 – 5:00 p.m. in the Noble Center Papermaking Studio

    Materials fee: large basket $95, small basket $79 (including canvas straps). Wear clothes and shoes that can get wet!
    Pre-registration is required; contact Cathy Tedford at 315-229-5174 or ctedford@stlawu.edu

    harold weston, clouds over giant

    Harold Weston, Clouds over Giant, 1922
    Oil on canvas, SLU 70.151

     


 

    Sacred Symbols in Sequins: Vintage Haitian Vodou Flags

    • "Haiti, Art and the Gods of Vodou," lecture by Donald Consentino, Monday, October 28, at 7:00 p.m., in Griffiths 123, with reception to follow.


    Donald Consentino is Professor of World Arts and Cultures at the University of California - Los Angeles. His research interests include Black Atlantic myth, rituals, art and popular cultures. He has done extensive fieldwork on oral traditions in  Sierra Leone (1972-3; 1983);  on Vodou art and mythology in Haiti (1986-present);  and on the flowering of alternative religions in Los Angeles (1979-present). He is the author of Defiant Maids and Stubborn Farmers: Tradition and Invention in Mende Story Performance (Cambridge University Press, 1982, 2008) and Vodou Things: The Art of Pierrot Barra and Marie Cassaise (University of Mississippi Press, 1998). He was the curator, editor and chief writer for the award winning project,  The Sacred Arts of Haitian Vodou (1995-99), and for Divine Revolution: the Art of Edouard Duval-Carrie (2004).

    vodou flag image

    Danbala Wèdo, late 20th century,
    satin, cotton, sequins, beads, and fringe,
    31 x 28 x 1/16 inches,
    courtesy Thomas Schultz Collection.  

    As a 2006 Guggenheim Fellow, Cosentino  completed fieldwork for Chasing the Dead, a book based on his travels with an Argentine-American magus and his Kongo spirit guide.   Cosentino is currently  chief curator for a major exhibition entitled  "In Extremis: Death and Life in 21st-Century Haitian Art," which opened at the UCLA Fowler Museum in the fall of 2012.  The Department of Art and Art History has provided funding support for the lecture by Donald Cosentino.

     

    A Hug for Harriet: Watercolors by Ray Whalen

    • Gallery discussion with Ray Whalen and Glenn S. Guiles, Monday, October 21, at 7:00, with reception to follow.

    Glenn S. Guiles is Professor and Dean Emeritus of Music Admissions at the State University of New York at Potsdam. Ray Whalen received his M.F.A from Cranbrook Academy of Art, Michigan, and is an art educator at Parishville-Hopkinton Central School. Both live in New York’s Adirondack Park.

      a hug for harriet

      Watercolor by Ray Whalen

       

     


     

    Poetry for Peace

    Readings are in the gallery on Mondays, begining at 4:30 p.m.

    • September 9
    • October 14
    • November 11
    • December 2

    Please come to read a poem you've written, a poem by a favorite poet, or just to listen to poems on a different theme. And bring your friends! You are welcome to read poems in languages other than English, but you should provide an English translation as well. Because we believe the empathetic community created by sharing ANY kind of poetry can lead to peace and social justice, we welcome all poems, not just those that touch directly on those themes.  Poetry for Peace readings are eligible for the First Year Cup. 

    Be sure to check out the Poetry for Peace blog!