Fall 2014 Course Schedule

GOVT 103-01 - Intro to American Politics
Dr. F. Exoo
M/W/F 10:30-11:30

GOVT 103-02 - Intro to American Politics
Dr. F. Exoo
M/W/F 11:40-12:40

GOVT 103-03 - WI: Intro to American Politics
Dr. Kling
M/W 2:30-4:00

GOVT 105-01 - Intro to Comparative Politics
Dr. Huang
M/W 12:50-2:20

GOVT 105-02 - Intro to Comparative Politics
Dr. Draper
M/W 8:50-10:20

GOVT 105-03 - Intro to Comparative Politics
Dr. McKie
W/F 10:30-12:00

GOVT 105-04 - WI:Intro to Comparative Politics
Dr. Draper
T/TH 8:30-10:00

GOVT 108-01 - Intro to International Politics
Dr. Vidanage
M/W 8:50-10:20

GOVT 108-02 - Intro to International Politics
Dr. Vidanage
M/W 2:30-4:00

GOVT 108-03 - WI: Intro to International Politics
Dr. Olesker
T/TH 8:30-10:00

GOVT 108-04 - WI: Intro to International Politics
Dr. Olesker
T/TH 10:10-11:40

GOVT 206-01 - WI: Political Theory
Dr. Buck
M/W/F 9:20-10:20

GOVT 206-01 - Political Theory
Dr. Buck
M/W/F 10:30-11:30

GOVT 290-01 - SEM:  Public Policy
Dr. Kling
M/W 10:30-12:00

GOVT 290-03 - SEM: Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
Dr. Olesker
T/TH 2:20-3:50

GOVT 291-01 - SEM: Foreign Aid
Dr. McKie
T/TH 10:10-11:40

GOVT 302-01 - Law and Courts
Dr. D. Exoo
M/W/F 9:20-10:20

GOVT 303-01 - Political Parties
Dr. F. Exoo
T/TH 1:00-4:00

GOVT 320-01 - African Politics
Dr. McKie
T/TH 2:20-3:50

GOVT 325-01 - Canadian Politics
Dr. Jockel
M/W 2:30-4:00

GOVT 330-01 - European Politics
Dr. Draper
T/TH 10:10-11:40

GOVT 363-01 - International Organizations
Dr. Vidanage
T 1:00-4:00

GOVT 368-01 - Democracy and its Critics
Dr. McConnell
M/W 10:30-12:00

GOVT 4001-01 - Right-Wing Soc Movements US
Dr. Kling
T/TH 2:20-3:50

GOVT 4003-01 - Asia: Beyond the Great Wall
Dr. Huang
M/W 10:30-12:00

GOVT 4004-01 - Torture Truth & Memory
Dr. McConnell
M 1:00-4:00

GOVT 4005-01 - International Conflict
Mr. Popovic
W 1:00-4:00

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS - Seminars and Special Topics

GOVT 290- SEM: Foreign Aid – Kristin McKie

Does foreign aid promote or hinder economic development and respect for human rights in the developing world? Are humanitarian, economic or political concerns more important in determining how donors allocate aid and why aid flows to certain countries and not others? In this course we will explore these questions by examining the determinants of development and humanitarian aid allocation by donors countries and assessing the impact of this aid on recipient states in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and other developing regions. Along the way, we’ll also take an in-depth look at how research is conducted in political science, with students learning how to identify a research question, design a research plan, use various forms of data as evidence and assess research findings.  Students will put their research skills to use by completing a  semester-long research project on question related to foreign or humanitarian aid.

GOVT 291-01- SEM: Foreign Aid-Dr. Kristin McKie

Does foreign aid promote or hinder economic development and respect for human rights in the developing world? Are humanitarian, economic or political motives more important in determining how donors allocate aid and why aid flows to certain countries and not others? In this course we will explore these and other questions by examining official development assistance (ODA) allocation by donors countries and international organizations (World Bank, IMF) and assessing the impact of this aid on recipient states in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and other developing regions. Along the way, we’ll also take an in-depth look at how research is conducted in political science, with students learning how to identify a research question, design a research plan, use various forms of data as evidence and assess research findings.  Students will put their research skills to use by completing a  semester-long 18-25 page research project on a question related to foreign aid.

Govt. 293-01-SEM: Israeli-Palestinian Conflict-Dr. Ronnie Olesker

This course is a research seminar. Your primary objective is to learn how to construct and write a research paper in the political science discipline, with a focus on international relations sub-discipline. The subject matter of your research is the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and so the secondary objective of this course is to familiarize students with the history, roots, and complexities of that conflict. We focus on the competing Israeli and Palestinian narratives of the conflict using academic literature, historical data, documentaries, and fictional movies. For a few students taking this course in fall 2014, there will an additional travel component option to Israel and Palestine over winter break.

Govt. 4001-01- Special Topics:  Right-Wing Social Movements in the United States - Dr. Joseph Kling

The emergence of the Tea Party in the 2010 mid-term elections has brought a new interest and engagement with right wing politics in this country. But the Tea Party is not necessarily all that new. It can be understood as part of a long political tradition in the United States. In this course, we will attempt to explore some of the basic principles underlying this tradition, gain an overview of the history of American Right in the twentieth century, and look at ideas which are supportive of this movement, as well as others which are critical of it. We will end the course by examining the history and character of the Tea Party , including some of the conflicts and tensions which have appeared between the movement’s supporters, and the more traditional elements of the Republican party. We will read works which see the Tea Party in a positive light, and works which challenge it.

Govt. 4003-01- Special Topics: Asia: Beyond the Great Wall – Dr. Grace Huang

This course explores the politics of NE Asia (N. and S. Korea, Japan, and Taiwan), SE Asia (Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines, Burma), and S. Asia (India). China will not be covered except from the perspective of these regions. The course investigates overarching themes to make sense of this vast and diverse area including: How has colonialism affected Asia’s developmental patterns? Does thinking about Asia as a region make sense (like a European Union)? How are we to understand Asia’s rise in the global context?

Govt. 4004-01- Special Topics: Torture, Truth and Memory – Dr. Shelley McConnell
Authoritarian regimes have often committed massive human rights abuses that included murder, torture, disappearances and forced adoptions. As a condition for transitioning to democratic governance the military insisted on amnesty for those crimes, but societies have sought to come to terms with their human rights history through other means: truth commissions, forensic anthropology, investigative journalism, international prosecution, collective memory projects and popular culture. Drawing on memoirs, torturers confessions, declassified documents, films, literature and analytical texts this course explores the ongoing struggle over who will interpret the political past, and what roles justice and forgiveness might play in securing democracy for the future. Course readings will center on Latin American cases, and students can apply those lessons in other world regions through their presentations and research papers.

Govt. 4005-01- Special Topics:  International Conflict – Michael Popovic

In this class, we are approaching conflicts from different analytical paradigms to reach a deeper understanding of causes, processes, and outcomes. The focus is on conflicts within the 20th and 21st centuries, from World War I to current conflicts such as in Sudan and Ukraine. Proper emphasis will be placed on the connections between political, military, and economic dimensions of international conflicts. Some of the questions we will answer include: Why do some conflicts remain peaceful while others culminate in tragedies such as genocide? How do conflicts alter systemic power structures and relations between states? What are the domestic forces behind conflicts and conflict resolution?