Grant Application Process

 

UPCOMING DEADLINESFaculty/Staff: Friday, February 17, 2012     Students:  Wednesday, March 7, 2012

 

Any person wishing to submit a grant for Mellon Funding should first carefully read through the following information to become familiar with the objectives of the grant and to fully understand the application process. You are also encouraged to read the full grant proposal, available here. After reading the background information, you should read the faculty or student guidelines for proposal narratives, read the information about preparing a budget, and complete the grant application (student proposal form or faculty proposal form). 

Submit your completed application form and supporting documents.  Faculty can e-mail all documents including the application form.  Students will need to print and submit the application form with signatures via campus mail (or hand-deliver) to Nancy Alessi, Environmental Studies Department, Memorial Hall 204.  Student proposal narratives and budgets should be e-mailed to Nancy.

Core Project Elements

The following elements serve to guide the Mellon Steering Committee in reviewing proposals for funding. Faculty, staff and students submitting proposals should address how their proposed projects involve the following elements. We do not expect all projects to include all elements.

Experiential: To deepen students' learning, a large focus of the project will be to provide students with firsthand, applied experience working on-site with real environmental issues. For example, these experiential learning opportunities may be based in research, advocacy, outreach, or other "hands on" activities.

Inter- and Multidisciplinarity: To help students appreciate both the complex nature of environmental issues and that their own work can often be enhanced through collaboration with those in other areas, a primary focus of the project will be the investigation of environmental issues from interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary perspectives, as well as disciplinary investigations that are informed through cross-disciplinary exploration and study.

Sustainability: To educate and inspire students and faculty to adapt more sustainable lifestyles, project activities that expose participants to different cultural, social, and/or technological ways to achieve low-impact living will be encouraged. Likewise, as participants propose activities that will produce tangible, positive impacts on the environment, they will be asked to look for ways in which those impacts can be sustained beyond grant funding.

Advocacy, Outreach, and Research: To enable students and faculty from different backgrounds to apply varying disciplinary knowledge, interests, and skill sets to learn about and address environmental issues, the project will promote and value equally a number of different kinds of environmental activities within the academic and scholarly framework, including advocacy, outreach, and research.

Local Impact: To enhance the regional/local environment in which St. Lawrence is located, project participants will seek to develop collaborative relationships with community partners (businesses, organizations, not-for-profits, etc.) to improve the physical, social, and economic environmental health of the area.

Global Awareness: To broaden students' perspectives beyond what they have experienced within their home and school communities, to provide students with new knowledge and information for in-depth comparative study across cultural, social, and geographic spectrums, and, ultimately, to prepare students to be agents of effective change within the global environmental arena, the project will support transformative "hands on" learning opportunities that will take students beyond the northeastern U.S. in which the University is located. However, as national and international travel is proposed within the project, participants will be asked to assess ways in which the other "core elements" of the project can potentially inform the activities and outcomes of the travel for greater overall positive environmental impact.

Further, the steering committee is interested in supporting projects that have the capacity to change communities for the better. These changes may take place in the SLU or another community (where the work is focused). We are interested in projects that have durability beyond the scope of the grant period. Though we will surely fund some projects whose impact is short-term, we also want to fund projects that can continue to impact the SLU community beyond the scope of grant funding (e.g. development of new courses, faculty collaborations, or community collaborations that will continue beyond the period of the grant).

Finally, to help students and faculty decrease the potential for implementing project activities that will have a negative impact on the environment, proposals should include estimates of the "environmental footprint" of the proposed activities (for example carbon usage) and offer suggestions for how they can and will mitigate or offset those factors.

Requirements for Grant Recipients

Faculty/Staff Requirements:

Faculty or Staff members who receive a Mellon grant agree to the following conditions:

  1. Grant recipients will submit a final report on the project, including an expense report, to the Mellon Committee within 2 weeks of project completion. These reports may be made publically available.
  2. Grant recipients agree to give a public presentation to the SLU community (e.g. CTL forum, Departmental seminar) about the work conducted for the grant, if appropriate.
  3. Grant recipients agree to acknowledge the Mellon Environmental Education Initiative for Active Learning, Research and Advocacy as a funding source in all products that result from the work completed as part of the grant.
  4. Grant recipients agree to a term of service on the Mellon Steering committee in the future.

Student Requirements:

Students who receive a Mellon grant agree to the following conditions:

  1. Students will submit a final report on the project, including an expense report, to the Mellon Committee within 2 weeks of project completion.  If appropriate, students should also submit a collection of findings, dataset, work of art or etc. Students submit work with the understanding that the works may be archived by the University Library and that the products of the grant may be made publically available.
  2. Students will present the results of the project as a poster, talk, performance or other completed work during the annual Festival of Scholarship.
  3. Students agree to acknowledge the Mellon Environmental Education Initiative for Active Learning, Research and Advocacy as a funding source in all products that result from the work completed as part of the grant.